Graduate Students

Graduate Student

Patrick is originally from Bethesda, Maryland and received his BA in Psychology from St. Mary’s College of Maryland (2010) and his MA in Psychology from the University of British Columbia (2013). His current research focuses on the corticostriatal regulation of emotional learning, in particular, how subregions of the prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum control different aspects of conditioned aversion.

Graduate Student

Meagan grew up in a small town in interior BC, called Sparwood, which is known for being the home of the world’s largest mining truck. Since that time, she has lived in such diverse and beautiful cities as Victoria, Montreal, London (the English one), and Lethbridge, Alberta. Meagan currently resides in her favourite place in the world, East Van. Her research centers on how prefrontal circuits malfunction in psychiatric disorders, especially in schizophrenia.  In her Masters, she studied how the UNC5C netrin-1 receptor contributes to the development and function of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system, and how alterations in the expression of this receptor may be involved in psychopathology. Meagan currently studies how prefrontal GABA hypofunction contributes to impairments in working memory, social behavior, and other cognitive and behavioral aspects of schizophrenia.

Graduate Student

Courtney Bryce is originally from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan where she received her BA with honors in Psychology from the University of Saskatchewan in 2013. Her honors thesis, under the supervision of Dr. John Howland, focused on how acute stress influences cognitive flexibility. She is currently a Master’s student in the Floresco lab and her present research involves elucidating the neural mechanisms mediating the influence of acute stress on effort-based decision-making.

Graduate Student

Nicole was born and raised in North Vancouver and completed her BSc in Psychology at UBC. She was extremely fortunate to have crossed paths with Dr. Floresco during her undergraduate degree, and is very excited to be pursuing a Master’s degree in the same lab.  Nicole’s research during her undergraduate studies focused on characterizing cortico-striatal and amygdalar circuits that control different aspects of cost/benefit decision making—specifically decisions related to reward uncertainty, or risk.

Graduate Student

Debra is from Montreal where she completed her BSc at McGill University working with Dr. Jonathan Britt. Debra’s current project in the Floresco lab involves dissecting the neural circuitry behind risk/reward-based decision making by optogenetically manipulating neural pathways within the mesocorticolimbic system.